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students

UC System Takes Another Step Toward Keeping Students Debt-Free

in Around California/School

The University of California is vowing to offer its California undergraduates a debt-free college experience by 2030 as part of an overhaul of how the system views college affordability.

To get there, the system of 230,000 students seeking bachelor’s degrees is relying on a mix of state and federal support, revenues from recent tuition increases, and students working part-time to cover the full cost of an education. Students from wealthier households would also rely on parental support.

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Local volunteers to host special prom night for Turlock youth

in Events/Fun

A group of volunteers is looking to provide local students who have special needs with an opportunity to experience their very own prom night, specifically tailored to their needs.

Prom with a Purpose: A Special Needs Prom will be held from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. April 2 at the Calvary Church gymnasium in Turlock. Attendees and their registered guests will be treated to a meal, a live DJ, a photo booth, and can have professional photos taken.

The event is free for local special needs teens and young adults and their guests. Guests may include parents, legal guardians, or other caretakers for the student that may be necessary. To further accommodate participating students, a multi-sensory safe room will be available at the venue for those who may become overwhelmed by noise, lights, crowds or other occurrences. There will also be medical and security personnel on-site.

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Students forced to leave Turlock schools meeting because adults won’t wear masks

in News/People/School

Students were forced to leave a meeting of the Turlock school trustees because some adults present — including a trustee — would not wear a mask.

On video from Tuesday’s meeting of Turlock Unified School District trustees, Board President Lori Carlson announces that because students are participating, the gathering is considered a school setting and all people in the room must wear a face mask. About 15 seconds passes, and adults remain unmasked; Carlson then tells the student representatives on the board that they must leave.

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Voice of the students on TUSD Board

in Education/School

Turlock students have a couple of their own advocating for them and voicing their concerns on issues big and small when it comes to the Turlock Unified School Board of Trustees. Bella Kern and Kate Ogden are the student representatives on the TUSD Board and participate in the board’s bimonthly meetings.

The two high school representatives felt that their involvement in an array of activities gave them the experience they needed to make a difference on the Board.

“I really like Turlock High and I’m really involved, I feel like I do a lot. So, I feel like I can represent what’s going on, maybe not the best, but in a respectable way,” said Ogden.

Continue Reading on Turlock Journal

Students bring a unique perspective to Sept. 11

in Community/People

This weekend marks the 20th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. While most adults have vivid memories of that infamous day, students today were not alive when those events took place and their understanding of the tragic events vary. In Turlock schools, the weeks leading up to the day will be used as an opportunity for remembrance and for students to learn more about the historic event.

9/11 is currently not part of TUSD curriculum, but it does cover the history of first responders and have discussions regarding the day.

“With the 20th anniversary approaching, students are likely to see images or videos on social media and across multiple media sources.  That means children are likely to come to school and want to talk about what they’ve seen. 9/11 is not specifically part of the curriculum, especially for our youngest learners.  They do cover communities and community helpers (fire, police, etc.),” said Chief Communication Coordinator at TUSD Marie Russell.

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New bill seeks to fix California’s doctor shortage by expanding student loan forgiveness

in People
FILE - In this Nov. 19, 2020, file photo, medical personnel prepare to prone a COVID-19 patient at Providence Holy Cross Medical Center in the Mission Hills section of Los Angeles. California is desperately searching for nurses, doctors and other medical staff, perhaps from overseas, to meet demands as the coronavirus surge pushes hospitals across the state to the breaking point. With many of the state's hospitals running out of capacity to treat the severest cases, the state has brought in and deployed more than 500 extra staff but it needs a total of 3,000 temporary medical staff members. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

(KTXL) – For as long as Andrea Silva could remember, she wanted to save lives. 

The UC Davis graduate dedicated a decade of her life preparing for a career in medicine, and in 2018, she traded in her cap and gown for a white coat.

“None of us are doing this for the money. None of us at all. We love what we do. It’s such a fabulous job and I’m so lucky to have it,” Silva said.

Silva is now in her last year of residency in Stanislaus County and while she’s excited for her future in health care, she worries about repaying the half-million dollars in loans it took to get there.

“It really is a burden to have such high loans,” Silva explained. “A lot of my residents talk about moving outside the state in order to get better loan forgiveness programs and it’s really disheartening.”

This week Rep. Josh Harder, D-Modesto, introduced a bill to help bring relief to Silva and other physicians in the making.

Continue Reading on Fox 40

Stanislaus State Launches Innovative Near-Peer Coaching Initiative to Boost Student Success

in Education

TURLOCK, Calif. -- California State University-Stanislaus (Stanislaus State), a Hispanic-serving institution that serves more than 8,600 students in California's Central Valley, today announced a major new initiative designed to improve student retention, particularly among low-income and first-generation students at its Stockton campus. Through a partnership with College Possible, a national nonprofit that connects high school and college students with near-peer success coaches, Stanislaus State will provide coaching and mentoring programs for more than 400 students from historically underrepresented backgrounds.

The partnership with College Possible builds on the nonprofit's 20-year history of training AmeriCorps service members as college access and success mentors to help low-income high school juniors and seniors enroll in -- and complete -- college. Dubbed Catalyze, College Possible intends to scale similar, near-peer coaching programs across a growing number of institutions nationwide. Recent results show that 92 percent of first time college students were retained from fall 2018 to spring 2019.

"We are proud to integrate new and innovative approaches to better support our students, which is why Catalyze is such a fitting new model for the unique needs of Stanislaus State students," said Kim Greer, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs at California State University, Stanislaus. "By tapping into the talents and experiences of recent college graduates and the near-peer coaching model, our partnership will enable us to close gaps in resource equity, help first-generation and low-income students navigate the first year of college, and prepare more students for a successful experience in pursuit of a degree."

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